What are the minimum and Maximum configurations for Windows family?


What are the minimum and Maximum configurations for Windows family?
Windows 2000 Operating System family

OS Name Processor RAM
(min.)
RAM
(rec.)
Free Hard
disk space
Supported
no. of Pros. RAM
Windows 2000
Professional
Pentium / 133MHz 32 MB 64 MB 650 MB
1 GB (rec.)
2 4 GB
Windows 2000
Server
Pentium / 133MHz 128 MB 256 MB Approx.1 GB
(Rec. 2 GB)
4 4 GB
Windows 2000
Advanced Server
Pentium / 133MHz 128 MB 256 MB Approx 1 GB
(Rec. 2 GB)
8 8 GB
Windows 2000
Datacenter Server
Pentium / 133MHz 128 MB 256 MB Approx 1 GB
(Rec. 2 GB)
32 64 GB

What does "Disable Recursion" in DNS mean?

What does "Disable Recursion" in DNS mean?

In the Windows 2000/2003 DNS console (dnsmgmt.msc), under a server's Properties ->
Forwarders tab is the setting Do not use recursion for this domain. On the Advanced tab
you will find the confusingly similar option Disable recursion (also disables forwarders).
Recursion refers to the action of a DNS server querying additional DNS servers (e.g. local
ISP DNS or the root DNS servers) to resolve queries that it cannot resolve from its own
database. So what is the difference between these settings?

The DNS server will attempt to resolve the name locally, then will forward requests to any
DNS servers specified as forwarders. If Do not use recursion for this domain is enabled, the
DNS server will pass the query on to forwarders, but will not recursively query any other
DNS servers (e.g. external DNS servers) if the forwarders cannot resolve the query.

If Disable recursion (also disables forwarders) is set, the server will attempt to resolve a
query from its own database only. It will not query any additional servers.
If neither of these options is set, the server will attempt to resolve queries normally:

... the local database is queried
... if an entry is not found, the request is passed to any forwarders that are set
... if no forwarders are set, the server will query servers on the Root Hints tab to resolve

queries beginning at the root domains

Old Blogging Roll in age of web 2.0

Marketing is most key roll in every business strategy. Blog Roll is the example of Network marketing. If I give you example the old roll is just like you old friend and new friend. You know well about your old friend (Old blog Roll) instead of new Friend. Blog roll is basically network marketing. As much you have big blog roll you have great worth of your blog.

Blogging is a revolution in the age of Web 2.0 Many of the participate in social network marketing (car of Web 2.0) network, such as Facebook, Skype, Flicker, My Space, Orkut, Hi5, Twitter and many more. Every one have the same goal, all allow to interactivity among their users. In the age of Web 2.0 Blogging have key roll. World wide blogging is growing as a great thing for promoting online engagement and public servants and also providing offline engagement. In the basis of blogging World Wide Web developers develops a set of lessons learned and a checklist of best participation of public. Some of thing need for blogger to compete the Web 2.0 age, always be regular blog, Spell check must some of peoples have many wrong spelling due to chatting, always consider multimedia, student blogging is more important, time commitment, every job do by your self and always define your self and also define what is you purpose of blogging.

I get a great quote, “what you need to concentrate when you are creating a blog. Consicer every blog, every blog post, every comment on a blog, every video and audio file posted on the Internet (every those that involve characters from Star Wars or silly dance-or both put together). Separately, they may seem innocuous or inane, and theay truly meet Lincoln’s test of being “little noted nor long remembered”. The analysts of Web 2.0 consumer, users generate media, and social network there is a sea change occurring wherein the web has become a truly participatory media.

What is Importance of DNS to Active Directory MS Windows 2004

Describe the importance of DNS to AD.
When Microsoft began development on Active Directory, full compatibility with the domain
name system (DNS) was a critical priority. Active Directory was built from the ground up not
just to be fully compatible with DNS but to be so integrated with it that one cannot exist
without the other. Microsoft's direction in this case did not just happen by chance, but because
of the central role that DNS plays in Internet name resolution and Microsoft's desire to make
its product lines embrace the Internet.

While fully conforming to the standards established for DNS, Active Directory can expand
upon the standard feature set of DNS and offer some new capabilities such as AD-Integrated
DNS, which greatly eases the administration required for DNS environments. In addition,
Active Directory can easily adapt to exist in a foreign DNS environment, such as Unix BIND,
as long as the BIND version is 8.2.x or higher.

When Microsoft began development on Active Directory, full compatibility with the domain
name system (DNS) was a critical priority. Active Directory was built from the ground up not
just to be fully compatible with DNS but to be so integrated with it that one cannot exist
without the other. Microsoft's direction in this case did not just happen by chance, but because
of the central role that DNS plays in Internet name resolution and Microsoft's desire to make
its product lines embrace the Internet.

While fully conforming to the standards established for DNS, Active Directory can expand
upon the standard feature set of DNS and offer some new capabilities such as AD-Integrated
DNS, which greatly eases the administration required for DNS environments. In addition,
Active Directory can easily adapt to exist in a foreign DNS environment, such as Unix BIND,
as long as the BIND version is 8.2.x or higher.